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  Google Plans Personal Health Record
Interesting Developments Posted by Ignacio H. Valdes, MD, MS on Thursday October 18, 2007 @ 01:07 PM
from the interesting-developments dept.
Google is announcing plans for Personal Health Record (PHR) software. Microsoft announced a similar but controversial effort less than two weeks ago. Google's offering is said to be available in 2008 so no analysis is possible yet. "Marissa Mayer, Google's vice president of search products and user experience, said Wednesday here at the Web 2.0 Summit that Google plans to support the "storage and movement" of people's health records...Although she provided only scant details on the effort, she noted that Google became interested in the personal health record market as it watched Hurricane Katrina take aim at the Gulf Coast and all the paper-based records stored in various medical offices and hospitals in the region..." Digg this article



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  • The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them.
    ( Reply )

    Re: Google Plans Personal Health Record
    by Ignacio H. Valdes, MD, MS on Thursday October 18, 2007 @ 01:11 PM
    All I can say to Google and Microsoft is: Welcome to my swamp. -- IV
    [ Reply to this ]
    • Re: Google Plans Personal Health Record
      by Lorie Obal on Thursday October 18, 2007 @ 11:22 PM
      PHRs: Dangerous to the professional health of physicians? I've always been troubled by the concept of a patient-controlled PHR due to the potential for "sins of omission" - HIV status, stocking up on controlled substances, unreported preexisting conditions, etc. It would seem that these issues leave physicians wide open to problems ranging from personal health danger, getting audited by the "state regulatory (substance)" agencies, and malpractice stemming from use of improperly maintained records. Has anyone compiled a list of potential provider perils associated with PHRs?
      [ Reply to this ]
      • Re: Google Plans Personal Health Record
        by Michael E Brown on Friday October 19, 2007 @ 07:00 PM
        I don't like the idea of a PHR, unless all doctors can put data/info into it, patient's can read it only, and must go through the physician to amend the record..... I do like the idea of a webportal for a PHR, but security and integrity of the PHR remains a concern.... Michael E. Brown
        [ Reply to this ]
      • Hazards of PHRs?
        by pacoit on Sunday October 21, 2007 @ 09:21 PM

        Why would a patient trying to get medical care give his doctor false information, which could undermine effective treatment?

        Today, doctors rely primarily on what the patient tells them; then tests may be performed to verify assumptions.

        Truth is, for most people--who see a doctor rarely, existing medical information (exams, etc.) is outdated, and new tests are made. It's stupid to delete or alter existing tests. But it wouldn't make much difference.

        Why should a doctor imagine to be liable for malpractice if the patient provides false (especially knowingly false) information? and in what way would that be different from today?

        "I don't like the idea of a PHR, unless all doctors can put data/info into it, patient's can read it only, and must go through the physician to amend the record...". Spoken like a lawyer.

        There is no reason to believe online PCHR will be less secure than industry controlled RHIO et al EMR infrastructure. On the contrary, assuming your PCHR won't be hosted by a data giant like Google or Microsoft, PCHRs will be subject to much less interference and abuse of data than RHIO et all systems. With free software, any commercial entity, community, neighborhood, or individual can setup their own online PCHR. You'll have the choice to go with whom you trust.


        [ Reply to this ]
        • Re: Hazards of PHRs?- Lying to the MDs
          by Lorie Obal on Monday October 22, 2007 @ 07:20 PM
          I knew patients would misrepresent their medical history to stock up on painkillers, but I never realized the domino notification effect once a physician gets suspicious (from physician comment on another site): "For example, I've been lied to many times by patients regarding narcotic pain medicine prescriptions. For example, I treated someone this year to whom I gave an rx for 30 vicodins. I get a letter a month later from the State Controlled Substance guys (because one physician who rx'd to this patient requested a print out of the patient's controlled substance prescription records - which triggers a letter sent to everyone who rx'd him controlled medicines in the past.) So this guy had gotten the equivalent of 30 vicodins daily over a period of a few months (from many doctors, using different pharmacies, often getting two or three rxs in one day.) This means either he is in fulminant liver failure from all the tylenol or he's selling it for fun'n'profit." The thing to keep in mind is that there are always people ready to game the system. A patient-controlled PHR, would seem to contribute to this problem if accepted at face value.
          [ Reply to this ]
          • Re: Hazards of PHRs?- Lying to the MDs
            by pacoit on Tuesday October 23, 2007 @ 05:23 PM
            A good point regarding prescription drugs.

            It occurs to me that some PHR information, such as prescriptions, is finite (i.e., non-changing over time). It seems such info could be made uneditable by the patient; only the originating physician would have edit ability.

            The patient should also be protected from the physician, such as if a physician adds/removes a prescription or changes an ill-considered one in a malpractice cover-up attempt. Timestamps and version control in the software can resolve this possibility.
            [ Reply to this ]

     
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